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20110331
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
correspondent rebecca cooper. >> said thank you for joining us. it has been a difficult week for the global a economy. of the disaster in japan continues to unfold and the economic effects are being felt here. ford motor co. told its dealers a cannot deliver a specific color paint because the pigment is made in japan and the longer available. this is a week where japan plays a big part in boosting our economy thanks to a 1912 gift of friendship. thiss the week we kickoff cherry blossom festival thanks to those 3000 trees delivered from japan. joining us today elliott ferguson ceo of destination c. we are glad to have him here to discuss the festival and the importance of tourism. we know about the people come to town because we see all the traffic but how many are expecting in town? >> thank you for having me here today, rebecca. we are expecting over 1 million people to come to whington, d.c. in the 2011, similar to what we had last year. for us, it is the beginning of the spring tourism season and it launches the entire mentum of tourism for the city for the rest of the year. >> there wa
and that's gonna do it for our show today thank you for joining us we hope you enjoyed your stay in wine country and we'll see you again next time. for more information about today's show log onto our website inwinecountry.com. >>> hi, everyone. welcome to "the wall street journal report." i'm maria bartiromo. he is a wall street maven, famous for his surprise predictions. i'm talk to byron wean about what he sees next. what will happen with oil, and the second anniversary of the bull market. my conversation with the ceo of america's largest bank. why debit, credit, and checking will all cost you more, and why he says washington is to blame. >>> and can america afford not to invest in innovation? we'll talk to young scientists about the problem of getting funding, and whether the u.s. will be left behind in the research war. "the wall street journal report" begins right now. >> this is america's number one financial news program, "the wall street journal report." now maria bartiromo. >> here is a look at what is making news as we head into a new week on wall street. like most 2-y
concannon vineyard in california's livermore valley, thank you for joining us,we hope you enjoyed your stay in wine country and we'll see you again next time. >>> tragedy in japan. uncertainty in the middle east. the stock market swoons. what it all means for the global economy and your portfolio. maria talks to a movie and marketing mogul. her discussion with harvey weinstein about the oscars, making movies and "the king's speech." and spiritual adviser deepak chopra on the soul of leadership. doing well and doing good. >> this is america's number one financial news program, "the wall street journal report." now maria bartiromo. >> i'll be back with more of the show in just a moment. but first, let's get to bill griffith. he has a look at some of the stories and the headlines right now. bill? >> thanks, maria. here is a look at what is making news as we head into a new week on wall street. volatility was certainly the word of the week or to the markets. the vix which measures volatility, affectionately known as the fear index spiked to its highest level since last july on the con
shouldn't lose focus on is the u.s. economy is doing very well. it's probably growing 3 to 4%. job creation has just notched up quite significantly. we're seeing better retail sales as a result of that. the manufacturing sector is very strong. and i think when this calms down, we're going to be left with that fundamental, which is still pretty good. >> and along those lines, john, it's pretty clear after the last couple of fed meetings that they're no longer concerned about deflation, that they are turning their attention to inflation, which right now statistically they're not that concerned about, even though we did get a pretty strong wholesale price index report this week, and a consumer price index, which is starting to show signs of inflation. what is your view of inflation and the fed policy? >> well, i'm more concerned about inflation than the fed is. i don't think it's just about this artificial concept of core excluding food and energy. >> right. >> i don't think that resonates with the public, with your viewers. they see gas prices every day. they fill the tank once or tw
of them with us today. why they say we should be worried, and what they say we should do. >>> also, my conversation with "new york times" columnist david brooks. we'll talk libya, politics, and his new book "the social animal." >>> and making movie magic with imax. the script for success and thinking big. i'll talk to the ceo. "the wall street journal report" begins right now. >> this is america's number one financial news program, "the wall street journal report." now maria bartiromo. >> here is a look at what is making news as we head into a new week on wall street. all that glitters is not necessarily gold. commodity prices are on a tear, and investors and traders are piling into precious metals. and oil. silver hit a 31-year high this week, closing above $38 an ounce. gold touched a record high as well, above $14.40 an ounce on gold. oil prices settling above $105 a barrel during the week. prices have jumped 24% just since the middle of february when the unrest in libya began. the stock market has generally been shrugging off higher commodities prices, but thursday the dow was up f
the problem of getting funding, and whether the u.s. will be left behind in the research war. "the wall street journal report" begins right now. >> this is america's number one financial news program, "the wall street journal report." now maria bartiromo. >> here is a look at what is making news as we head into a new week on wall street. like most 2-year-olds, it can be cranky and moody. but the bull market celebrated its second birthday this week. the markets hit bottom on march 9th, 2009 after the financial crisis. since then, the dow is up better than 80%. the s&p 500 up better than 90%. but the question is will high oil and gasoline prices derail the rally? crude oil touching two-year highs this week, staying north of the $100 a barrel mark. and gasoline hit an average of $3.52 a gallon last week, 27% higher than a year ago. >>> the markets had choppy week as a result. the dow tanked on thursday, down more than 200 points, its biggest decline since august. on weaker than expected news from china and more worries about the mid east. the markets rebounded on friday. >>> forbes sought with th
lives. and that's gonna do it for our show today, thank you for joining us, we hope you enjoyed your stay in wine country, and we'll see you again next time. >>> hi, everybody, welcome to "the wall street journal report." the jobs report, oil breaking an important barrier and the markets go on a wild ride. behind the numbers with pimco's mohamed el-erian. plus one of the most powerful and important members of congress. i'll talk to budget committee chairman paul ryan about debt, the deficit and taxes. >>> also, the godfather of hip-hop, a major mogul in the hip-hop world, fashion and finance. joining me to talk about having it all, russell simmons on the real meaning of success. "the wall street journal report" begins right now. >> this is america's number one financial news program, "the wall street journal report." now maria bartiromo. >> here is a look at what is making news as we head into a new week on wall street. it is one of the most important indicators of the strength of the economy and the economic recovery. and on friday, the unemployment report for february came out
. mohamed el-erian is with us. he is ceo and chief investment officer of pimco. mohamed, great to see you. >> thank you, maria. >> we saw 192,000 new jobs created in the month. the unemployment rate dropping to 8.9%. but you say there is more that we need to look at in order to really get a true picture of the economy. what do you mean? >> the good news as you say that we've created jobs in a broad-based manner. so that's the good news. the bad news is when you look behind the numbers, there are increasingly structural assets. so for example, teen unemployment, which is really important. because if you're unemployed early on in your career, you become unemployable. that is 24%. the average duration of unemployment has gone up to 37 weeks. which means that the longer you're unemployed, the quicker your skill erosion. and finally, labor participation. how many people are actually in the labor force has come down. so the good news is that we're creating jobs. the bad newss that we need to do even more to really put a dent into this serious unemployment problem. >> how are we going to do that
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)